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’Cause all games were better on the GBC

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#26 2013-11-10 07:23:20

Pokemon_Master
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Re: What is ASM ?

Miksy91 wrote:

Every decimal or hexadecimal number has a binary presentation.
For example number "5" is "101" in binary system.

Long binary numbers aren't really readable for a human so we use hexadecimal number system instead. I can't think of any editor that would show data in binary instead of decimal or hexadecimal.

You said that number 5 is 101 in binary system. Is nuber 4 100?

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#27 2013-11-10 07:38:36

ShaneM
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Re: What is ASM ?

Pokemon_Master wrote:
Miksy91 wrote:

Every decimal or hexadecimal number has a binary presentation.
For example number "5" is "101" in binary system.

Long binary numbers aren't really readable for a human so we use hexadecimal number system instead. I can't think of any editor that would show data in binary instead of decimal or hexadecimal.

You said that number 5 is 101 in binary system. Is nuber 4 100?


Dude, you are lucky... Coincidentally, it is 100. But did you know that $03 is 11? Instead of guessing, use a calculator with programming mode, such as Windows calculator... Stop guessing and try stuff.


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#28 2013-11-10 09:04:49

Miksy91
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Re: What is ASM ?

It works like this;

Decimal number system contains 10 numbers: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, ..., 9.
After 9, we've got 10. After 19 comes 20, and so on. (like everyone knows..)

Each decimal number can be written in "ten's power" form (no idea what the real translation to english should be called).
For example decimal number 1274 in ten's power form is:

1* 10^3 + 2 * 10^2 + 7 * 10^1 + 4 * 10^0 = 1000 + 200 + 70 + 4 = 1274


Hexadecimal system then again has 16 different numbers in it: 0, 1, 2, ..., 9, A, B, C, D, E, F.
After 9 comes A. After A comes B, ..., and after F comes 10.
Conversion of hexadecimal number 0x39B to decimal:

0x3 * 16^2 + 0x9 * 16^1 + 0xB * 16^0 = 3* 16^2 + 9 * 16 + 11 = 923


Binary system contains only 2 numbers: 0 and 1.
After 0, comes 1. After 1 comes 10. After 10 comes 11. After 11 comes 100, 101, 110, 111, 1000, 1001, 1010, 1011, 1100, 1101, 1110, 1111, 10000 and so on.

Binary numbers then again can be written in "two's power" form since the number system only contains two different numbers.
As example, conversion of binary number 110101 to decimal system:

1 * 2^5 + 1 * 2^4 + 0 * 2^3 + 1 * 2^2 + 0 * 2^1 + 1 * 2^0 = 2^5 + 2^4 + 2^2 + 2^0 = 32 + 16 + 4 + 1 = 53

After this example, it should be self-explanotary how to convert for example value 124 from octal system to decimal.

Last edited by Miksy91 (2013-11-10 09:14:05)

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#29 2013-11-10 09:32:05

Pokemon_Master
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Re: What is ASM ?

Miksy91 wrote:

It works like this;

Decimal number system contains 10 numbers: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, ..., 9.
After 9, we've got 10. After 19 comes 20, and so on. (like everyone knows..)

Each decimal number can be written in "ten's power" form (no idea what the real translation to english should be called).
For example decimal number 1274 in ten's power form is:

1* 10^3 + 2 * 10^2 + 7 * 10^1 + 4 * 10^0 = 1000 + 200 + 70 + 4 = 1274


Hexadecimal system then again has 16 different numbers in it: 0, 1, 2, ..., 9, A, B, C, D, E, F.
After 9 comes A. After A comes B, ..., and after F comes 10.
Conversion of hexadecimal number 0x39B to decimal:

0x3 * 16^2 + 0x9 * 16^1 + 0xB * 16^0 = 3* 16^2 + 9 * 16 + 11 = 923


Binary system contains only 2 numbers: 0 and 1.
After 0, comes 1. After 1 comes 10. After 10 comes 11. After 11 comes 100, 101, 110, 111, 1000, 1001, 1010, 1011, 1100, 1101, 1110, 1111, 10000 and so on.

Binary numbers then again can be written in "two's power" form since the number system only contains two different numbers.
As example, conversion of binary number 110101 to decimal system:

1 * 2^5 + 1 * 2^4 + 0 * 2^3 + 1 * 2^2 + 0 * 2^1 + 1 * 2^0 = 2^5 + 2^4 + 2^2 + 2^0 = 32 + 16 + 4 + 1 = 53

After this example, it should be self-explanotary how to convert for example value 124 from octal system to decimal.

Hey the binary system of zeroes and ones looks a bit easier than the other byte systems.

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#30 2013-11-10 09:58:11

Miksy91
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Re: What is ASM ?

Pokemon_Master wrote:

Hey the binary system of zeroes and ones looks a bit easier than the other byte systems.

All of the number systems work in exactly same way...
Also, number systems don't have anything to do with bytes.

One byte consists of 8 bits. All computer data is stored as bits which are binary numbers (and so can either be zeroes or ones).

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#31 2013-11-10 10:12:41

Pokemon_Master
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Re: What is ASM ?

Miksy91 wrote:
Pokemon_Master wrote:

Hey the binary system of zeroes and ones looks a bit easier than the other byte systems.

All of the number systems work in exactly same way...
Also, number systems don't have anything to do with bytes.

One byte consists of 8 bits. All computer data is stored as bits which are binary numbers (and so can either be zeroes or ones).

Again: What is the difference betwen ASM Hex,PKSV-UI Scripts?

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#32 2013-11-10 11:17:59

comet
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Re: What is ASM ?

nothing

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#33 2013-11-10 11:18:30

ShaneM
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Re: What is ASM ?

Pokemon_Master wrote:
Miksy91 wrote:
Pokemon_Master wrote:

Hey the binary system of zeroes and ones looks a bit easier than the other byte systems.

All of the number systems work in exactly same way...
Also, number systems don't have anything to do with bytes.

One byte consists of 8 bits. All computer data is stored as bits which are binary numbers (and so can either be zeroes or ones).

Again: What is the difference betwen ASM Hex,PKSV-UI Scripts?


Again: Are you just ignoring all his posts? He JUST explained to you what hex is... this is a lost cause.

Pokemon Master: You were on my forum today... do you read at ALL? http://shanempkmngen1boards.freeforums. … ex-editing

It is clear to me that you really don't care to learn.

Last edited by ShaneM (2013-11-10 11:23:11)


I'm back. I'll try not to get as frustrated with stupid questions. People on my naughty list:

*Pokemon_Master
*Noizy
*lipun
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#34 2013-11-10 11:29:10

Pokemon_Master
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Re: What is ASM ?

ShaneM wrote:
Pokemon_Master wrote:
Miksy91 wrote:

All of the number systems work in exactly same way...
Also, number systems don't have anything to do with bytes.

One byte consists of 8 bits. All computer data is stored as bits which are binary numbers (and so can either be zeroes or ones).

Again: What is the difference betwen ASM Hex,PKSV-UI Scripts?


Again: Are you just ignoring all his posts? He JUST explained to you what hex is... this is a lost cause.

Pokemon Master: You were on my forum today... do you read at ALL? http://shanempkmngen1boards.freeforums. … ex-editing

It is clear to me that you really don't care to learn.

ShaneM I'm not ignoring his posts i just can't understand some things. That's why i created this topic.

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#35 2013-11-10 12:02:48

Miksy91
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Re: What is ASM ?

Pokemon_Master wrote:
ShaneM wrote:

It is clear to me that you really don't care to learn.

ShaneM I'm not ignoring his posts i just can't understand some things. That's why i created this topic.

I believe that you care to learn, but you won't bother to try to understand.

It probably took me around 10 minutes to write that example of decimal, hexadecimal and binary systems since I tried to write it so that it would be as simple to understand as possible. Now read it again, and again, and yet again. Spend for example 15 minutes, or even more, trying to catch up.

Try to find similarities between those calculations, and solutions.
What I mean by solution is for example;

What does ten's power tell? Why can decimal number 1274 also be represented as: "1* 10^3 + 2 * 10^2 + 7 * 10^1 + 4 * 10^0" ?
That should give you the keys to move forward.

Last edited by Miksy91 (2013-11-10 12:05:40)

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#36 2013-11-10 12:09:47

Pokemon_Master
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Re: What is ASM ?

For more info i'll watch your asm video tutorial.

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#37 2013-11-19 18:52:54

Skurbert
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Registered: 2012-12-16
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Re: What is ASM ?

Quick question: Is it possible to find the games "hardcoded" offsets in a hex editor, delete them and replace them with ASM code?

Yepp. It sounds absolutely rubbish and I'm NOT trying to pull this off. I'm just a bit curious. :-)

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#38 2013-12-17 05:28:31

ShaneM
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Re: What is ASM ?

Skurbert wrote:

Quick question: Is it possible to find the games "hardcoded" offsets in a hex editor, delete them and replace them with ASM code?

Why not just use Pokered or Pokecrystal and then assemble with RGBDS? (There is even a Windows build.) Another way of adding/changing ASM code is using BGB debugger.

P.S. The disassemblies already contain comments on what specific offsets do. You will need to learn some Game Boy Zilog 80 and understand what it's doing. My suggestion is, use the disassembly even if you do a change using a hex editor. The disassemblies will make your life easier.

Last edited by ShaneM (2013-12-17 05:29:59)


I'm back. I'll try not to get as frustrated with stupid questions. People on my naughty list:

*Pokemon_Master
*Noizy
*lipun
*Spambots

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